Lammas on 1st & Full Moon on 3rd

Lammas is celebrated on August 1st and is the first of the three harvest festivals (the Autumnal Equinox and Samhain being the others). The first fruits of summer are enjoyed. There are many festivals and ceremonies but throughout, there is a custom of climbing hills and mountains – we have Lewesdon hill our our doorstep 🙂

August’s Full Moon is on Monday, 3rd and is known as the Sturgeon Moon.  So called because the giant sturgeon of the Great Lakes and Lake Champlain in North America were most readily caught during this part of summer. It is also referred to as Full Green Corn Moon, signalling that the corn was nearly ready for harvest, Grain Moon, Fruit Moon, Barley Moon. Wheat Cut Moon, and Blueberry Moon.*

The word “sturgeon” means “the stirrer”, which is what this giant freshwater fish does when it is looking for food; it stirs up the mud and silt on river and lake bottoms.  The sturgeon is sometimes called a “living fossil,” as it belongs to a family of fish that has existed for more than 135 million years.
SturgeonIn ancient times, it was common to track the changing seasons by following the lunar month rather than the solar year, which the 12 months in our modern Gregorian calendar are based on.

*For millennia, people across Europe, as well as the Native American tribes, named the months after features they associated with the Northern Hemisphere seasons, and many of these names are very similar or identical.

#Broadwindsor #Dorset #WestDorset #Lammas #FullMoon #Sturgeon #LookUp #FirstFruits #Harvest #Celebration #StaySafe

 

 

Full Moon on Sunday, 5th July

July's Buck MoonJuly’s Full Moon is known as the Buck Moon named after the new antlers that emerge from a buck’s forehead around this time of the year.
Another name for July’s Full Moon is Thunder Moon because of the frequent thunderstorms in the summer. The Anglo-Saxon name is either Hay Moon, after the hay harvest that takes place in July, or Wort Moon, indicating that July is the time to gather herbs (worts) to dry and use as spices and remedies.
For Hindus this is the Guru Full Moon (Guru Purnima) and is celebrated as a time for clearing the mind and honouring the guru or spiritual master. For Buddhists, this full Moon is Dharma Day, also known as Asalha Puha or Esala Poya.

There will be a partial penumbral lunar eclipse in the early hours of Sunday morning which the tabloids are promoting – but don’t expect to see much!

#Broadwindsor #StaySafe #SocialDistancing #FullMoon #LookUp

Penumbral Lunar & Solar Eclipse in June

Strawberry Moon in JuneThe new lunar cycle begins this evening around 6.30pm.  This June, we will get a chance to see both a solar and lunar eclipse. The first will be the Lunar Eclipse, which will happen on June 5th, then will come the Solar Eclipse, on June 21st.

A Solar Eclipse occurs when the Moon passes between Earth and the Sun, which totally or partly blocks out the Sun for a viewer on Earth.

A Lunar Eclipse can occur only on the night of a Full Moon.
It occurs when the Moon moves into the Earth’s shadow. This can occur only when the Sun, Earth, and Moon are exactly or very closely aligned (in syzygy), with Earth between the other two.
In a Penumbral Lunar Eclipse, the Moon moves through a portion of the Earth’s outer shadow. The Earth restricts or obstructs the sunlight from reaching the Moon.
The eclipse starts at 18.45 hrs. but won’t be visible until the Moon rises above the horizon around 21.15 hrs. Look South East. The eclipse ends at 10:04 pm.
The next Penumbral Lunar Eclipse that we’ll be able to see is on 30th November.

June’s Full Moon on the 5th is also known as the Strawberry Moon., being the time of year for ripening strawberries.  June was traditionally the month for marriages – it is even named after the Roman goddess of marriage, Juno. Following marriage comes the “honeymoon,” which give may give credence to this Full Moon’s name.

#LookUp #StaySafe